A New Vision for the Informatics Profession in Health & Social Care

The UK Council of Health Informatics Professions, BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT, and the Institute of Health Records and Information Management (IHRIM) are working collaboratively to create a new federation for the Informatics profession. The three autonomous bodies will work closely together to ensure that health informatics is recognised as a valued profession across the UK.  Other relevant professional bodies will be welcome and encouraged to join the Federation which is to be called the Federation for Informatics Professionals.

This short video produced with ITN Productions explains more.


 

The Federation for Informatics Professionals website will be launched shortly. Meanwhile news and updates will be listed here.

 

Fed-IP Update

PHaC20

Representatives of the Fed-IP shadow board are working with the HSCIC and Health Education England on the development of the programme which will address Workstream 6 of the NIB Framework – Personalised Health and Care 2020 (PHAC20).  Workstream 6 of PHaC20 deals with “supporting care professionals to make best use of data and technology” and one of the key sub-objectives is Professionalism; turning the specialist informatics community into a professional cadre, able to support colleagues across the sector to deliver the aspirations outlined in PHaC20.  This is one of the key objectives of Fed-IP and further updates on progress will be posted after the next meeting of the NIB Steering Group taking place on 17th June.

Fed-IP Prospectus

The Fed-IP Prospectus sets out why the Federation has been formed and who is involved.

Read Prospectus

Why this initiative is essential

beverley-bryantNHS England Director of Strategic Systems and Technology, Beverley Bryant explains why this initiative about professionalism in health and social care is essential.

View video 

Fed-IP contributes to UK Health Informatics Forum

On 4th March Fed-IP board members Mandy Burns, CEO of IHRIM, and Simon Edwards, Director of Professional Services at CILIP, took part in the first of the 2015 series of UK Health Informatics Forum events.  The panel session chaired by Dr Mark Davies, considered the need for informatics professionalism in health and social care.

The Health Series is made up of two national UK Health Informatics Forums, supported by a series of smaller on-site workshops that allow interaction with delegates across the UK at local sites where projects are implemented.  The next event will be held in Bristol on 14th May.  Details of the complete series can be found here.

Fed-IP present at HC2015, part of UK e-Health Week

Representatives of all the Fed-IP member professional bodies were present on the exhibition stand at HC2015, held at Olympia in London on 3rd and 4th March as part of  UK e-Health Week.

2015-03-03 12.53.15

This was the first occasion that all the professional bodies had come together publically as the Federation for Informatics Professionals.  There was a significant amount of interest from conference delegates in what the Federation is aiming to achieve and what each of the individual member professional bodies is able to offer through membership.  Fed-IP were involved in several conference sessions including Energising Leadership and Professionalism and Preparing the Next Generation of Informatics Leaders.

More Professional Bodies join the Fed-IP

Representatives from Socitm, the Society of IT Management which promotes the effective and efficient use of Information Technology in Local Government and the Public Sector, CILIP, the Chartered Institute for Library & Information Professionals and AphA, the Association of Professional Healthcare Analysts have joined the Fed-IP shadow board, to help shape the Federation and provide more opportunities for informatics staff in health and social care to develop their professionalism and achieve registration with the Federation.

Establishment of a Faculty of Medical Informatics

A joint proposal from the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) to explore the feasibility of setting up a Faculty of Medical Informatics was unanimously supported by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges on Nov 18, 2014.

The longer term aim of this work will be to address the Professional concerns that are specific to health care professionals involved in, or planning a career in, Clinical Informatics. These concerns are currently most acute for medically qualified Clinical Informaticians who as a result of quinquennial revalidation face the very real risk losing their General Medical Council registration if nothing is done. The primary focus for the proposed Faculty will therefore be to put in place a robust remedy for this most pressing problem; this will include exploring the feasibility of creating a new Medical sub speciality of Medical Informatics.  It is expected that the Faculty will also wish to explore ways of supporting Clinical Informaticians from other health care professions.

Work is now under way and is being led by the RCGP and RCP.  All who are involved in this have been committed from the outset to collaborating closely with the Federation for Informatics Professionals.

Local Networks

Fed-IP Chair Dr Gwyn Thomas recently met with the NHS London CIO Network who have agreed to set up a sub-group, including representatives from Local Government, to take the lead on Professionalism  and to liaise with Fed-IP to help to shape our future direction and plans.  They also agreed to include three Key Objectives their Network annual plan, for:

  1. Developing and Implementing Professional Standards
  2. Increasing Registration & Professional Membership
  3. Improving Communications and Engagement

A similar approach has already been agreed with the Director of eHealth & External Collaboration in Northern Ireland and with CIOs in the North West of England.

Fed-IP Shadow Board

The last Fed-IP shadow board meeting was held on 14th July 2015.  Currently the board includes representatives from UKCHIP, BCS, IHRIM, Socitm, CILIP, AphA, HSCIC and the emerging Faculty of Medical Informatics.

Contact Fed-IP

To contact the Federation for Informatics Professionals, email admin@fed-ip.org

You can now also follow Fed-IP on Twitter 


 

Informatics Professionalism is like a rainbow

Gwyn Thomas

Becoming a chief information officer in the NHS is a big step. To recognise this, the Health CIO Network is putting together a handbook for new health CIOs; and, indeed, practising CIOs who want to reflect on aspects of their job.

Dr Gwyn Thomas, the chair of the Federation for Informatics Professionals, has contributed a chapter on Informatics Professionalism which is reproduced below.

Informatics Professionalism is like a rainbow

chapter_two-rainbow

Professionalism is like a rainbow: wondrous to behold but complicated to explain; easy to spot but difficult to pin down.

At work, one of the highest accolades that you can be given is to be called a “true professional”. It’s a simple phrase that sums up the blending and integration of a variety of skills.

Professionalism tends to be thought of as conducting yourself within a code of ethics, with integrity, accountability, and excellence.

It means communicating effectively and appropriately and always finding a way to be productive. High quality work standards, honesty, and respect for others are also part of the package as are teamwork and collaboration.

“Professionalism is doing the right thing when no-one else is looking.”

Why is professionalism important?

Professionalism is the cornerstone for building a reputation that commands the respect of society; to be considered the equal of other professionals such as lawyers, doctors, nurses, engineers, architects and accountants.

Being seen by others as a professional is the foundation for gaining recognition for your abilities and achievements. Being a professional is important because it is a way to invest in yourself.

What is a professional?

A professional is someone who cares enough about what they do to take personal responsibility for self-improvement. They are prepared to broaden their capabilities and face up to the personal accountability required to work in the service of others.

A professional never stops learning, not just for the sake of learning, but to be better at what they do. A professional believes that lifelong learning enhances their self-image and that, by applying their skills in accordance with a code of practice, they will earn the respect of others.

A professional is an individual who:

  • Takes responsibility for their own actions
  • Is prepared to justify their decisions and actions
  • Keeps up to date with their field of knowledge
  • Abides by ethical principles and standards of behaviour
  • Contributes to leadership in their profession.

“Your reputation as a professional is determined by the lowest standard that you tolerate, not the highest that you have achieved.”

How do you achieve professionalism? A few ‘golden rules’

Learning – “What you know”

  • Practise critical thinking; contribute to the knowledge base
  • Show appreciation for scholarship and research; understand the theoretical foundation of ideas and actions
  • Read current journals; keep abreast of technical advances
  • Participate in conferences; learn ‘on-the-job.’

Action – “What you do”

  • Actively support a professional body; live up to its values
  • Share your knowledge and experience freely; take advantage of the knowledge and experience of others
  • Evaluate your professional practice; confront your own shortcomings and those of your fellow professionals
  • Speak up for your profession; don’t talk it down.

Behaviour – “How you do it”

  • Strive towards self improvement; commit to personal development
  • Reflect on your successes and on your failures; seek out the perspectives of others
  • If you say you are going to do something, then do it; but when necessary say “no” without fear or guilt
  • Turn up on time; be aware of the impact of your behaviour on others.

Why have professional bodies been created?

Professional bodies have been set up to further the interests of their individual members by providing independent collective leadership to enhance the profession’s reputation and influence.

Professional bodies also have an important role in safeguarding the public interest through defining, maintaining and enforcing high standards of training and ethics.

Many professional bodies also act as learned societies for the academic disciplines underlying their professions. They are involved in the development and monitoring of educational programmes, and the updating of skills. This may include certification to indicate that a person possesses relevant qualifications in the subject area.

What is the value of registration with a professional informatics body?

Public registers have been set up for the common good; to protect the public through the application of professional standards and the regulation of individuals who fall below them. They are an essential component in building and maintaining public trust and professional reputation.

Professional registration promotes high standards of behaviour and ethics. Registration with a professional body is, in some cases, a legal requirement and the primary basis for gaining entry and setting up practice.

Registers are risk based, which is why some are a mandatory legal requirement or part of a licence to practise, while others are voluntary. They are open to all so anyone (public or employers) can look up the details of a registered practitioner when they are making decisions about:

  • Employment
  • Use of services
  • Raising concerns
  • Making a complaint.

Taking personal action to join a publicly open register is a demonstration that you are prepared to face up to a moral obligation to apply your knowledge and skills in ways that benefit society as a whole or, at the very least, “do no harm.”

What is the value of professional informatics registration for the public and patients?

The public and patients can be assured that:

  • Their personal information will be held securely and safely by qualified professionals with due regard to their rights to access, protect and share their own information
  • Clinical staff are supported by certificated informatics professionals in their use of knowledge, information and digital technology
  • Digital information systems in health and social care are designed, implemented and managed by competent professionals who have signed up to a code of conduct and are maintaining their competence in their areas of expertise
  • They can look up the public register of informatics professionals to see whether the people responsible for handling their information have up to date qualifications and experience
  • Any complaints they have about the failure to adhere to professional standards in the handling of their information will be investigated independently and appropriate action taken.

What are the benefits of membership of a professional informatics body?

Individual members will be able to:

  • Demonstrate that they are qualified and accountable
  • Be supported in mapping out a clear path to career advancement
  • Speak with an independent collective voice to influence policy and practice and gain recognition for their professional contribution
  • Increase any employer’s confidence that they have the skills required for the role for which they are applying or in which they are currently being employed
  • Assure employers that they are committed to conducting themselves in a safe and professional manner
  • Access a network of peers to share learning, ideas and good practice
  • Come together to bring about change and “give something back”
  • Connect with users and subject matter experts to build understanding of requirements and avoid repeating the mistakes of others.

There are other wider, public interest benefits too:

  • When making job appointments or dealing with complaints, employers will be able to find out:
    • the qualifications and experience of an individual practitioner through the public register, their date of registration and its expiry
    • the qualifications / criteria that are necessary for an individual to be on the register and remain on it, and how they are assessed.
  • There will be a clear code of conduct to which individual professionals will be accountable for compliance.
  • There will be a clear complaints process, simple and easy to use for both organisations and individuals.
  • Information on whether an individual has had a finding against them, and what sanctions were taken will be publically available.
  • There will be an independent, confidential, whistleblowing mechanism for:
    • staff to raise issues of professional misconduct of their organisation or working colleagues
    • investigations into breaches of professional codes of practice or failure to adhere to professional standards of professional.
  • There will be clear definition of the implications of misconduct, breaches or failure.
  • Annual registration includes the requirement for continuing professional development which will allow public demonstration that skills and knowledge are being kept up to date.

So, what’s the minimum commitment required from every Chief Information Officer?

If they really want to be considered a professional, never mind an information leader, then every CIO should:

  • Join a licensed professional body to appear on the register of the Federation for Informatics Professionals (Fed-IP); and live up to the values and code of practice
  • Take an active role in national and local professional groups and networks; offer their knowledge freely and openly for the benefit of others
  • Adopt the “golden rules”; and use them to promote the culture of informatics professionalism with peers and colleagues
  • Speak up for the informatics profession; be an advocate through what you do as well as what you say
  • Share your successes and your failures; help the profession speak with a credible voice capable of using our collective experience to shape policy and practice
  • Make sure that everyone in your team understands the importance of meeting professional standards in everything they do; make sure that they have an up-to-date set of organisational objectives, a personal development plan and support for developing their career.

Further reading:

To find out more about professionalism and why you should take it seriously, have a look at the following:

  1. Federation for Informatics Professionals
    www.fed-ip.org
  2. “Professionalism in healthcare professionals”
    – report by the Health & Care Professions Council published May 2014

    www.hcpc-uk.org.uk
  3. The Professional Standards Authority
    www.professionalstandards.org.uk
  4. “Dilemmas and Lapses”
    – Report by the National Clinical Assessment Service 2009
    www.ncas.nhs.uk/events/conferences/previous-conferences/professionalism-dilemmas-and-lapses/
  5. The Engineering Council
    – Benefits of Professional Registration

    www.engc.org.uk/benefits.aspx
 
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UKCHIP requires high standards of conduct and competence for registrants.  Contact UKCHIP if you  have a concern or wish to make a complaint about a registered health or social care informatics professional.

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UKCHIP Public Registers

Access the UKCHIP registers of professionals who have met the assessment criteria.

UKCHIP EQAS Accreditation

Accreditation of Education & Training

The UKCHIP Education Quality Assurance Scheme  incorporates a register of accredited qualifications, training and courses which have met the criteria which support registration as a health and social care informatics professional.

Professionalising Health Informatics

Professional Development

Find out about a range of career and development opportunities for both aspiring and current health and social care informatics professionals.